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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,099 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> tonight, two stories from syria in this special edition frontline. first, as the fighting rages, frontline is embedded with rebel leaders. >> this is the front line of aleppo. you meet people in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs
for international negotiations rather than military intervention in syria. >> we need a solution that preserves the unity of this brotherly state, involves all factions of the syrian people without mitchell, religious, or sectarian division. >> he also said it was outrageous that palestinians are still being denied their right to an independent state. the dig at israel was no doubt appreciated by iran. >> for more, we go now to our correspondent, who is standing by at the un general assembly. tough talk from a mood ahmadinejad in his final address as iranian president, but nothing new, really. >> the question is how bad these grants will be against israel and the united states. there were some side blows, but i would say for the state usually is in, he was kind of mild. he wants to establish a new world order that he is suggesting with all countries being equal, everybody living in peace and harmony -- that is at least what he said, but if you go into details, it does not make much sense. >> the egyptian president also took to the podium today, saying he opposes military intervention in syria.
. as the civil war continues in syria, the head of the red cross holds talks with the president on the humanitarian situation. >> michelle obama drums up support at the democratic national convention. >> and a strike by list on the cabin crew grounds thousands of passengers at three major german airports. >> the president of the international red cross has launched a mission to syria to seek greater protection for civilians. rubble-held areas are reported to be facing severe food shortages and a number of refugees fleeing the company's is mounting. >> they met with president assad in damascus to seek an end to the situation in the war torn country. >> they met for 45 minutes. he left damascus -- left damascus with a promise of the red cross could operate in damascus as long as the state impartial. >> the meeting in touched on issues related to the protection of the civilian population. during the conduct of hostility, the necessity for immediate access to health care services, to food and other basic necessities that have increased due to the continuing fighting. >> the lack of
for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about the issue earlier today. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there's a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, peaceful protest. in a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. we must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding the rights does not end in the cycle of sectarian violence. together we must stand with those syrians who believe in a different vision, a syria that is united and inclusive where children don't need to fear their own government. and they have a say, sunni's and christians. that's what america stands for, that's what we will stand for sanctions and consequences to those who persecute and support for those who work for the common good. >> rose: they have the resolution to increase the government three times. meanwhile the killing in syria continues. they're up to 30,000 estimated dead. the impasse is just one of the many strains on relations between
this hour -- at the start of the un general assembly in new york, barack obama calls for action on syria where it security detail remains deadlocked. >> the head the european central bank defends the bank's bond- buying plans. >> and haunting masterpieces -- a museum in frankfurt exhibits paintings that happen to the dark side of romanticism -- tap into the dark side of romanticism. under way in new york. right now, much of the international community is focused on the conflict in syria. u.s. president barack obama in his address called for world leaders to end the regime of bashar al assad. >> the emir of qater, which is reportedly spending symbols -- emir of qatar, reportedly funding rebels, went so far as to say the regime should be taken down. russia and china indicated they have no intention of abandoning assad. >> the conflict in syria overshadowed every other topic at the opening of the general assembly in new york. the u.n. security council remains divided over sanctions against damascus, which have been blocked by syrian allies. u.n. secretary-general ban ki- moon renewed his ca
, much of the international community is focused on the conflict in syria. u.s. president barack obama in his address called for world leaders to end the regime of bashar al assad. >> the emir of qater, which is reportedly spending symbols -- emir of qatar, reportedly funding rebels, went so far as to say the regime should be taken down. russia and china indicated they have no intention of abandoning assad. >> the conflict in syria overshadowed every other topic at the opening of the general assembly in new york. the u.n. security council remains divided over sanctions against damascus, which have been blocked by syrian allies. u.n. secretary-general ban ki- moon renewed his call for sanctions against syria. >> this is a serious and growing international -- that to international security. >> he said the council could no longer turn a blind eye to syria where he said the conflict has claimed 27,000 lives. u.s. president barack obama also condemned the violence. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there is a cause that cries out for protest
and has also come to power in a time of increasing regional instability. in syria, the conflict between the government and free syrian army is settling into a long and bloody war. the middle east peace process in which egypt played a leading role has stalled as rhetoric heats up over iran's nuclear program, israel is increasingly isolated and most recently anti-american protests have sprung up in cairo and across the arab world, perhaps making a new arab cool relations with the west. mohamed morsi's days as a political prisoner of the mubarak regime are over but many challenges lie ahead. i spoke with him at his hotel during his visit to the united nations general assembly. here's that conversation. mr. president, thank you very much for taking time out of a very busy schedule, having just arrived in new york and welcome back to america. >> ( translated ): thank you very much. >> rose: what do you hope to accomplish here? >> ( translated ): first of all, i'd like to salute the viewers through this program in order to thank you for this interview and this opportunity and i'm not new or a
with david lesch, author of the new book, "syria: the fall of the house of assad." i actually met with bishara lessard, interviewed him many times as well as syrian officials fear professor of middle east history as well as trinity university, welcome to the table. thank you for being here. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> opposition calls for overthrow by sheer al-assad at a rare meeting of the entire machine groups held in the government controlled capital of damascus in an attempt at a gathering to position itself as an alternative to the armed rebels, citing the internal opposition on the syrian to cater. who are these people and what do you make of what they are saying? >> that's a good question. many fault lines in the syrian opposition. differences between the exiled syrian opposition a set of s-sierra, those fighting and dying on the ground in syria and those who are little more religious commission may come a arab opposition and those that are more secular opposition. and then you have those calling for the overthrow of the regime and those that are still blind to ne
targeted iraqi security force, many civilials were killed, al qaeda is being blamed for attacks. in syria aleppo came under fierce air attack again. amateur video claims to show the results of a government attack, crowds pulling victims from the rubble. in addition 17 others were killed when a car bomb exploded in aleppo. we have received a series of dramatic photos from our partner the world news web site globalpost which show how a neighborhood in aleppo was transformed in just seconds. first a number of family members were washing down a street in aleppo, they are alerted to something, a government tank approaching. so they grab their arms. the tank fires first, hitting the rebels, only one survives. the others lie dead on the street. they just washed. >> secretary of state clinton met with president vladimir putin of russia this weekend urging him to help end the conflict in syria. but she came away with no agreement. our state department correspondent margaret brennan sat down with clinton who said the syrian stockpile of chemical weapons is of special concern right now, especially i
problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third wasiran an nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to w but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two
to find a solution to the conflict in syria. >> charlie, less's be honest, be very frank, syrian situation is a tough one. there are no easy answers. in a way the russians and the chinese have become a welcome alibi. if they had said we have no problem, do what be you want what would have happened? what would we have done. >> what do you think would have happened? >> i don't think the system for intervention. the people on the ground are waiting for intervention, as some see intervention along the lines of libya i don't think that is a solution in syria. i think you make the situation worse. and many countries are not prepared to go in and do that. >> rose: the u.s. economy, syria, and the life of the secretary-general when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the knoll following:. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. all eyes will be on the federal reserve this thursday when it is expected to announce further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust res
>> and now, "bbc world news america." >> haunting stories emerge from syria. a special report on the widespread use of sexual violence, including rape. running battles in athens as police confront protesters angry at the new round of severe government cutbacks. author j.k. rowling reveals her new book and her regrets about writing to of her most famous novel so quickly. >> there were times when it was really tough, and i read them and i think, maybe i will go back and do it over. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. two massive bomb blast have shaken the syrian capital today setting the military headquarters of light. bombs and bullets are not the only weapons in this war. we heard firsthand evidence of rape being used to emulate and a great victims -- used to humiliate victims. graphic attacks are taking place. >> is just one of the many roads along which they fully. these are among the quarter of a million refugees of syria's war. they bring with them a handful of belongings and stories of crimes that haunt the survivors. this woman said she was
and said time has come for immediate change in syria. he says bashar al-assad must learn from recent history and step down before it is too late. he would like to have a court comprised of several countries to deal with the issues in syria. there is a memorial to mark the andage-taking in the 1970's during the munich olympics where some israeli athletes were killed. now, whether greece an deserves the next package of bailout money. the ax is likely to fall hardest on pensions. our correspondent reports on the impact of austerity. >> keeping agile to confront the challenges ahead, for years they have put aside money for comfortable old age. but with plans for another cut the pensions to raise 4.5 billion euros, the elderly are being stretched beyond their means. coffee time used to be a chance to relax. now all the talk is of financial concerns. >> i am in despair. this cannot go on. my children have no work and no home. my pension is cut. i dreamt of a different life. >> what can i say. if they lower my pension even more, i might be left with just 100 euros per month to live. why sho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,099 (some duplicates have been removed)